service recovery

When Customers are…Jerks - 7/14/20


Some people are a little extra…uh…difficult to deal with these days. Customers may have concerns or complaints – many of which are justified. But some customers act like…well…jerks. They’re not kind or understanding or have any idea how poorly they treat others. They’re obnoxious and yet, we still have Read more

Customers Appreciate Your Kindness - 7/7/20


The 3rd grade teacher had a phrase she used with her students. She wanted them to be “kind-hearted.” It was a phrase she used over and over again; no matter what she taught, this was an overriding emphasis on how she would communicate with students and how she expected Read more

6 Common Sense Responses to Customer Service Encounters - 6/30/20


I’ve run into this personally and professionally, and it drives me batty! Sometimes there’s a lack of common sense in the customer service provided by companies. And often that lack of common sense is due to the preference of a business to provide service in a certain method, to Read more

Caring for Co-workers through COVID - 6/23/20


A recent Buffer.com study asked employees who are working remotely due to COVID-19, what was their greatest struggle. While there were many different responses, the Top 2 totaled 40% of the struggles identified - Loneliness and Collaboration/Effective Communication. When you hear something like this - that individuals working remotely are Read more

React, Reflect, Respond - 6/16/20


Sometimes you can’t help it. You gasp. You get upset. You get angry. You have this look of shock on your face. You say something defensive. You react. I love people who are in customer service roles. These are the folks that people say things to in the business world Read more

Serving the Technology-challenged Customer - 6/9/20


The IT helpdesk representative was on a call with a customer, and in trying to troubleshoot an issue, the employee said, “Let’s start by opening Windows.” The customer said “OK,” and there were 2 minutes of silence. The employee twice asked, “Are you still there?” with no response. Finally, Read more

Address the 4 P’s for a Customer-friendly COVID-19 Walk-in Experience


This is not about what is medically most effective – please see the CDC for those guidelines.  This is about how to help your customers have a great experience as an onsite visitor at your facility or storefront.  For a comprehensive approach to a customer-friendly COVID-19 experience, address the Read more

The Deeper Reason to Transform the Customer Experience - 6/2/20


Why are government offices putting up plexiglass between their staff and their customers?  Why is restaurant takeout being done in such a way that is contactless and yet still fosters engagement between the employee and customer?  Why have so many traditionally onsite businesses converted to delivery businesses? The answer is Read more

Motivating Yourself when Working Remotely - 5/26/20


For any of us who are working remotely, we are finding ourselves more and more having to be self-motivated. And while many people are naturally self-motivated, others need to have that manager who gives us the encouragement. Many of us need to have that ongoing informal dialogue with co-workers Read more

Defining Organizational Agility in a Time of Uncertainty


You may have heard references in management theory over the many decades about the importance of a business being an “Agile” organization, but oftentimes that is a word thrown out in generalities to illustrate vague points about how organizations should be managed and make decisions.  In this time of Read more

With Customer Issues and Complaints, It’s All About Speed

Posted on in Business Advice Please leave a comment

Fast…Do it fast…Make them feel like you’re moving at light speed…Make them feel like there’s continuous action…

When you’re dealing with a complaint or a customer issue, a key to retaining (and even increasing business with) that customer is speed.

Studies have shown that if you resolve an issue of a customer, they will tell 5 people about the great work you do. If you resolve issues quickly, you have an 82% chance of repurchase v. only 54% chance of repurchase if you resolve it slowly. So speed aids retention to the tune of 28%!! Speed.

It takes a lot for some customers to complain; so if they care enough to complain, convey you care, too, by acting to resolve that issue fast.

Tell them you want to help them. Tell them what you’re doing to address the need. Give them status updates along the way. Ensure your organization has communication and service delivery processes in place which are speed-oriented and geared toward service recovery situations.

Evaluate how you handle these situations. Look internally, and test externally with mystery shopping, but assess, and improve.

When it comes to Service Recovery, find a need for speed.

Read our New Book – “Ask Yourself…Am I GREAT at Customer Service?” http://www.amigreatat.com/

Interested in improving your company’s customer service? See more at our new website! http://www.cssamerica.com/


Calling All Customers – Scream About Service!

Posted on in World of Customer Service Please leave a comment

When people find out that I’m a customer service speaker, researcher, and consultant, they immediately think that they have license to vent and complain to me…and I love every minute of it!

If people didn’t complain when something goes wrong, it would mean one thing – they’re apathetic. And nothing is worse than apathy. Care about SOMETHING!

The reason I love the daily/hourly challenge of helping organizations improve customer service is because – at its core – customer service is about caring for people. There’s an inherent greater good in what you do in business if what you do helps to improve how other people are treated.

So bad customer service should not be ignored. From the customer’s perspective, companies should be put on notice that “you better change or I’ll leave.” From the company’s perspective, bad customer service should be addressed and improved by management and staff.

Now when you receive poor customer service, don’t be apathetic – take action. There are many places to complain on the web, but better yet – complain to the company first, give them a chance to save you, and then leave if they don’t. Communicate your irritation and anger.

Studies have shown that only 1 in 26 of us will bring a concern directly to a company when we feel there’s an issue, so imagine how much more seriously that businesses would take us if they heard about all 26 issues! For some companies, it would be an avalanche of complaints and concerns.

On the flip side, if someone does something well, compliment them. Tell them that you – as a customer – care about customer service, and you thought that they did a GREAT job.

Make your voices heard loud – don’t be apathetic. Don’t always wait for someone to ask you for your opinion. Give it to them; be respectful, but give it to them.

You’ll be surprised how good you feel and how much your opinion is appreciated. And if your opinion isn’t appreciated, have the guts to say “good bye.”

Read our New Book – “Ask Yourself…Am I GREAT at Customer Service?” http://www.amigreatat.com/

Interested in improving your company’s customer service? See more at our new website! http://www.cssamerica.com/


In Pursuit of…a WOW Director

Posted on in Business Advice, World of Customer Service Please leave a comment

In yesterday’s article titled Assistly Redefines Customer Service With New Role, VP of Customer Wow, a CRM/Customer service software firm (Assistly) touts a newly created position – “VP of Customer Wow.”

Whether this position will do what it’s marketed to do remains to be seen, but we like several aspects of it.

First, this is a CXO level position, and we often talk about organizations who care about customer service needing to have structures that support that culture and management that models what’s expected of employees.

Second, the “Office of Customer Wow” is supposed to have broad-based authority across divisional silos, so that should help in their role as problem solver for their customers.

Third, the Office must spend about 20% of its time on “Random Acts of Kindness” for its clients – essentially proactive free work.

Look inside your own organization, and think about the culture you want to create. Do you have the structure, the leadership, the proactive customer touches that drive client retention and growth?

Look at your own organization to find your inner Customer Wow!

Read our New Book – “Ask Yourself…Am I GREAT at Customer Service?” http://www.amigreatat.com/

Interested in improving your company’s customer service? See more at our new website! http://www.cssamerica.com/